Effective January 1, 2020, California will require manufacturers of “connected devices” to equip those devices with reasonable security features. An example of a reasonable security feature (provided in the bill) would be to assign each device a unique password or to prompt the user to generate a password on setup.

This new law follows a trend that has been gathering steam since 2015, when the FTC provided security guidance to Internet of Things device manufacturers. Just a year later, the Mirai botnet used a DDos attack to take down a number of popular web services, in one of the first major Internet of Things attacks. DDos attacks leverage the internet connections (bandwidth) of large numbers of unsuspecting persons. First, the bad-actor infects the person’s device with malware. Then these devices can be remotely-forced to connect simultaneously to various targets (think Netflix), overwhelming their ability to communicate and shutting down the service. These types of large-scale attacks are especially dangerous in the Internet of Things context, where otherwise innocuous devices such as light-fixtures, DVRs, toasters, pet-feeders, and countless others begin to come online.

While this new bill asks very little of manufacturers, it is a crucial first step that will force manufacturers of internet-connected devices to put in place at least some common-sense security features.

Our take

This new bill requires very little of manufacturers and provides very little in terms of security for consumers. To address Internet of Things security, both regulators and companies need to provide platforms and standards that are easy to integrate, update, and adopt.