A few months ago we posted an update on the California Consumer Privacy Act, a mini-GDPR that contains serious privacy ramifications for the U.S. privacy landscape. Likely in response to the upcoming 2020 go-live for the California law, various groups have noticed an uptick in lobbying directed at the passage of a federal privacy law that would pre-empt the California law and help harmonize the various state laws. Pushing to the front of that effort is a new draft federal privacy law proposed by Intel.

The Intel law looks to be written specifically to pre-empt the California law, as it contains language that would pre-empt any State law with civil provisions designed to reduce privacy risk through the regulation of personal data. This pre-emption contains limited exceptions for state-data-breach, contract, consumer protection, and various other laws, but it would drive a hole through California’s law. Furthermore, Intel’s proposed law could pre-empt various specific laws such as Illinois biometric data protection law, and because it does not include any notice provision — it would be reliant on the state-breach-notification statutes to find violations in the first place.

Beyond frustrating state attempts at personal information regulation, the law creates penalty caps that result in disproportionate punishments for smaller and mid-size security incidents and allow larger incidents, typical of a larger company, to operate on an eat-the-fine basis. For example: The Equifax breach from earlier this year affected 143 million Americans. If regulators chose to bring an action, the maximum penalties for the action could be up to $16,500 per violation — that means a maximum penalty of 2.3 trillion dollars. The penalty cap however was set at 1 billion dollars, meaning the largest data breaches will face the lowest penalty-per-impacted individual.

Our take

This proposed national privacy law would primarily serve the interests of the largest players in the tech and data industry, while providing harsher relative penalties to smaller and mid-size players. This law or something similar is likely to see serious political debate in the next few years as lobbying efforts intensify. Expect the heat to turn up as we near January 1, 2020.